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What if you had 8 names and no one knew what to call you? Wild garlic aka wild onion, wild leeks, ramps, ramsons, spring onion, wood leek, Allium tricoccum has that exact problem. While I like the name “wild garlic,” I have to agree with my chef-sister Julia Richardson: These ramps by any name don’t share the concentrated garlic flavour, unless you eat them raw and very fresh. So call them what you like, enjoy them in soups, pestos, pastas, salads, egg dishes or risottos. And enjoy them if you can find them because in Canada ramps are considered rare delicacies.

Wild Garlic Omelette

Wild Garlic Omelette

  • 6-10 wild garlic leaves, slivered chiffonade
  • 2-3 wild garlic bulbs, thinly sliced
  • 3-4 organic eggs, in a medium-sized bowl
  • 1 scallion, thinly sliced
  • 1 t Dijon mustard
  • 2-4 T goat cheese
  • 1/4 t sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tomato, sliced
  • 1/2 avocado, sliced
  • 2 spelt flour Azim bread wraps (Optional, but a nice change from regular wraps or bread.)
  • 1 T olive oil

Wild Garlic Omelette

Preheat the oven to 400F.  Heat the bread right on the oven rack for several minutes to crisp them up.

Add wild garlic leaf chiffonade, Dijon mustard, salt and pepper to eggs and beat lightly to combine. Heat the olive oil in a medium sized skillet. Sauté the scallion and wild garlic bulbs for 1-2 minutes on medium heat. Add the egg mixture and cook for 2-3 minutes, flipping at half-time.

Place a hot, crisp Azim bread on a dinner plate. Place half the omelet on each wrap. Add 1 tablespoon of goat cheese on top of each serving of egg. Garnish the plate with tomato and avocado slices. Use the flower tips from the wild garlic to garnish the goat cheese. Serve hot. Serves 2.

Wild Garlic Omelette

Final notes:

  • Ramps are a threatened species in Quebec. A person may have ramps in his or her possession outside the plant’s natural environment or may harvest it for the purposes of personal consumption in an annual quantity not exceeding a maximum of 50 bulbs or 50 plants. The protected status  prohibits any commercial transactions of ramps; this prevents restaurants from serving ramps as is done in the United States. Failure to comply with these laws is punishable by a fine. In Ontario ramps may be legally harvested and sold.
  • Thanks, Julia, for bringing wild garlic to my attention and for encouraging me to try them out. I can’t resist a new taste sensation! Everyone who tried this Wild Garlic Omelette was a fan.

Wild Garlic Omelette

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